Aug 12, 2022  
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2020-2021 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Search


Note: General Education course attributes can be used as keywords (e.g., type TGEC in the Keyword or Phrase text box and click “Filter” to search for all courses certified in Enhanced Gen Ed as Creative Thinking). For a list of General Education attributes, see General Education Information .

 

AML - American Literature

  
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    AML 3413 - Historical Perspectives in Early American Literature


    Credit(s): 3
    Examines American literature from the Colonial Period to the Civil War as a manifestation of geographical, political, social, and intellectual forces. Will not be counted toward the English major.

  
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    AML 3604 - African American Literature


    Credit(s): 3
    A study of black American literature from the nineteenth century to the present, including the works of such writers as W.E.B. Dubois, Jean Toomer, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, LeRoi Jones, and Nikki Giovanni.

    Course Attribute(s): WRIN - Writing Intensive Capstone, ELWP - Literature and Writing, 6ACP - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, 6ACT - State Communication Requirement

  
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    AML 3630 - U.S. Latino/Latina Literature in English


    Credit(s): 3
    This 3000-level literature course surveys American English literature by Latino/Latina writers (with Spanish American ancestry). Authors may include Piri Thomas, Sandra Cisneros, Esmeralda Santiago, Luis Valdéz, Tomás Rivera, Oscar Hijuelos, etc.

    Course Attribute(s): SMCD - Community Engagement & Diversity Pillar

    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1101  and ENC 1102 
  
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    AML 3641 - Native American Literature and Film


    Credit(s): 3
    A survey of Native American literature and films written and produced from the 1960s to the present. It will emphasize the cultural and political contexts out of which these productions emerge by analyzing political cartoons, articles, discourses, etc.

  
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    AML 3674 - Asian American Literature and Film


    Credit(s): 3
    This course is a critical survey of Asian American popular culture, especially literature and film. We will emphasize the social and political contexts out of which these productions emerge by analyzing political cartoons, news articles, and discourses.

  
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    AML 4111 - Nineteenth-Century American Novel


    Credit(s): 3
    A study of the American novel from its beginnings through 1900, including such novelists as Cooper, Hawthorne, Melville, James, Twain, Crane, and Dreiser, among others.

  
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    AML 4121 - Twentieth-Century American Novel


    Credit(s): 3
    A study of major trends and influences in American prose fiction from 1900 to the present, including works by such writers as Hemingway, London, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Faulkner, West, Mailer, Bellow, Ellison, Donleavy, Updike, Vonnegut, and others.

  
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    AML 4261 - Literature of the South


    Credit(s): 3
    A study of the major writers of the Southern Renaissance, including writers such as Faulkner, Wolfe, Caldwell, Hellman, McCullers, O’Connor, Warren, Styron, Tate, Davidson, and Dickey.

  
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    AML 4300 - Selected American Authors


    Credit(s): 3
    The study of two or three related major authors in American literature. The course may include such writers as Melville and Hawthorne, Hemingway and Faulkner, James and Twain, Pound and Eliot, Stevens and Lowell, etc. Specific topics will vary. May be taken twice for credit with different topics.

  
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    AML 4624 - Black Women Writers


    Credit(s): 3
    Black women writers focuses on the literature of women of Africa and the African Diaspora. It examines the social, historical, artistic, political, economic, and spiritual lives of Africana women in context of a global community.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACP - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, ELWP - Literature and Writing

  
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    AML 4931 - American Literary Movements and Genres


    Credit(s): 3
    Looks at a movement or genre in American literature (19th-century novel, Harlem Renaissance, Puritan sermons, etc). Building on skills from survey courses, class requires heavy but focused reading, familiarity with literary scholarship, and writing.

    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1102 , with a grade of C- or better
  
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    AML 4933 - Studies in American Literature and Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines a particular topic or theme, varying with individual selection, in the American literary tradition.

    Prerequisite(s): ENC 1102 , with a grade of C- or better
  
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    AML 5305 - Studies in Individual American Authors


    Credit(s): 3
    This course provides advanced study of two or three selected authors who are considered to have made major contributions to the development of American literature.


AMS - American Studies

  
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    AMS 2030 - Introduction to American Studies


    Credit(s): 3
    An overview of American Studies, the interdisciplinary study of American culture. Analysis of the arts and literature, including music; social issues; popular culture; material culture; cultural diversity; and social change.

    Course Attribute(s): HHCP - Human Historical Context & Process, CAHU - Humanities

  
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    AMS 2201 - Colonial American Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    An examination of cultural patterns in America as they developed between 1600 and 1780 with an emphasis on the texture of everyday life.

  
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    AMS 2270 - Twentieth-Century American Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    An examination of cultural patterns in America from 1900 to the present with emphasis on the texture of everyday life.

    Course Attribute(s): HHCP - Human Historical Context & Process, CAHU - Humanities

  
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    AMS 2363 - Issues in American Civilization


    Credit(s): 1-3
    An examination of selected topics such as natural environment and the quality of life, sports and American society, popular music, American communities, vigilante tradition, jazz music, role of the family, American success myth, youth in America. Topic varies.

  
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    AMS 3001 - American Culture 1880-1915


    Credit(s): 3
    Integration of major aspects of American life between the 1880s and World War I.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement

  
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    AMS 3212 - Nineteenth-Century American Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    An examination of cultural patterns in America from 1776 to 1900 with an emphasis on the texture of everyday life.

  
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    AMS 3230 - America During the 1920s and 1930s


    Credit(s): 3
    Course provides an interdisciplinary examination of American culture during the turbulent interwar years, 1919 through 1941. Students will examine how the arts, advertising, fashion, and social behavior registered changing cultural values.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement

  
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    AMS 3260 - American Culture, 1830-1860


    Credit(s): 3
    Examines the patterns of American culture in the years leading up to the Civil War. Topics include religion and social reform, race relations, and the impact of industrialization.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement

  
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    AMS 3302 - Architecture and the American Environment


    Credit(s): 3
    By means of slides, lectures and discussion, this course examines 350 years of American architectural history. Architectural styles, aesthetics and the relation between a building and its social environment are stressed.

  
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    AMS 3370 - Southern Women: Myth and Reality


    Credit(s): 3
    This course will identify the myths surrounding Southern women, discern their sources and purposes, and contrast them with history.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, WRIN - Writing Intensive Capstone

  
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    AMS 3601 - Material Culture and American Society


    Credit(s): 3
    By means of slides, lectures and student projects, examines connections between artifacts and American cultural attitudes from 17th century to present. Topics include: architecture, furniture, gravestones, toys, and the material subcultures of women, African-Americans and communal societies.

  
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    AMS 3605 - Working Class Culture in America


    Credit(s): 3
    An interdisciplinary examination of the cultural identity of American working class families from WWII to present.

    Course Attribute(s): CPST - Capstone Learning Experience

  
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    AMS 3615 - Film & American Society


    Credit(s): 3
    This course offers a broad introduction to American cinema history. Exploring the aesthetic and ideological consequences of a variety of genres and modes, it also asks how individual films engage historically specific socioeconomic and cultural context.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, WRIN - Writing Intensive Capstone

  
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    AMS 3700 - Racism in American Society


    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines the roots and contemporary structures of racism in America. Students develop critical, working definitions of race that account for change over time, geography, and co-constructed vectors of power such as class, gender, and sexuality.

    Course Attribute(s): TGEE - Ethical Reasoning and Civic Engagement, CASB - Social & Behavioral Sciences, GCPC - Global Citizens Project Course

  
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    AMS 3930 - Selected Topics in American Studies


    Credit(s): 1-3
    Offerings include Cultural Darwinism in America, America Through Foreign Eyes, and The Female Hero in American Culture.

  
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    AMS 4210 - Regions of America


    Credit(s): 3
    The pattern of American culture as revealed through an examination of selected writings and other pertinent materials dealing with selected American regions. Topic varies.

  
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    AMS 4305 - Photography and American Society


    Credit(s): 3
    A survey of photography as an art and a craft in America since the mid-nineteenth century. Attention devoted to technological innovations, leading personalities, major movements, and memorable icons. Open to majors and non-majors.

  
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    AMS 4804 - Major Ideas in America


    Credit(s): 3
    Investigates the role of one or more influential ideas in American culture, for example: individualism, identity, community, dissent, reform, utopianism, democracy. Emphasizes the critical analysis of a variety of primary texts. Topic varies.

    Course Attribute(s): CPST - Capstone Learning Experience

  
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    AMS 4910 - Individual Research


    Credit(s): 1-4
    The content of the course will be governed by student demand and instructor interest. Instructor approval required prior to registration.

  
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    AMS 4930 - Selected Topics in American Studies


    Credit(s): 1-3
    Offerings include the social implications of American painting, Technology in Twentieth Century America, American Environmental Problems, Popular Culture in America, American Military Experience, and Labor in America.

    Restriction(s):
    • Senior Standing
    • Majors Only

  
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    AMS 4932 - Topics in American Film


    Credit(s): 3
    Topical course on American film genres and themes. Variable topics such as: series on a region, performer, subject, or period of time.

  
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    AMS 4935 - Senior Seminar in American Studies


    Credit(s): 3
    The American Studies Senior Seminar focuses on the writing of a substantial research paper. Topic varies.

    Course Attribute(s): CPST - Capstone Learning Experience

    Prerequisite(s): HUM 3804 , HUM 4331  and AMS 4936 
  
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    AMS 4936 - American Studies Pro-Seminar


    Credit(s): 3
    A course emphasizing the analysis of primary works in relation to cultural contexts, the integration of secondary sources, and the construction of a written argument. Topic varies.

    Prerequisite(s): HUM 3804 
  
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    AMS 4940 - Internship in American Studies


    Credit(s): 1-3
    A structured, out-of-class learning experience designed to provide first-hand, practical training in careers related to American Studies.

    Restriction(s):
    • Permit Required
    • Majors Only
    • S/U Grade System

    Other Information: Repeatable up to 6 credit hours.

ANT - Anthropology

  
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    ANG 5395 - Visual Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    This class will examine the major dimensions of visual anthropology with an emphasis on the visual means of presenting anthropology to the discipline and general public. The course will focus on visual documentation and study of visual images.

  
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    ANG 5406 - Ethnobotany: People, Plants and Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines the structure and function of plants, the development of the field of ethnobotany, and the practice of ethnobotany.

  
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    ANG 5486 - Quantitative Methods in Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    This course is an introduction to quantitative methods for the anthropologist covering both classical statistical approaches and exploratory data analysis, using computers with statistical software.

  
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    ANG 5901 - Directed Reading


    Credit(s): 1-4
    Individual guidance in concentrated reading on a selected topic in Anthropology. Contract required prior to registration.

  
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    ANG 5910 - Individual Research


    Credit(s): 2-4
    Individual guidance in selected research project.

  
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    ANG 5937 - Seminar in Anthropology


    Credit(s): 2-4
    Topics to be chosen by students and instructor.

  
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    ANT 2000 - Introduction to Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    The cross-cultural study of the human species in biological and social perspective. Surveys the four major branches of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, linguistic anthropology, and cultural anthropology.

    Course Attribute(s): SMSS - Social Sciences, SPSS - Social Sciences, SMEL - General Education Elective, SGES - General Education Core Social Sciences, CASB - Social & Behavioral Sciences

  
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    ANT 2410 - Cultural Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    Students are exposed to methods and concepts for cross cultural study of the world’s peoples. Case studies demonstrate variations in human adaptation and encourage an understanding of and appreciation for diverse cultures and their values.

    Course Attribute(s): CAGC - Human & Cultural Diversity in a Global Context, SMSS - Social Sciences, SPSS - Social Sciences, TGED - Human & Cultural Diversity (also requires two Global Citizens Project learning outcomes), SMEL - General Education Elective, 6ACT - State Communication Requirement

  
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    ANT 2464 - Global Health from a Social Science Perspective


    Credit(s): 3
    Using global health as a lens, this course will introduce students to critical interdisciplinary challenges that will shape the world in the future. It combines classroom and experiential learning while accessing the extraordinary resources of London.

    Course Attribute(s): CAGC - Human & Cultural Diversity in a Global Context

  
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    ANT 2511 - Biological Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    This is an overview of biological anthropology. It covers areas such as evolutionary theory and genetics (critical thinking and scientific process), human variation (diversity), and epidemiology (environment). It also has a historical component.

    Course Attribute(s): CANL - Natural Sciences (Life Science), SPNS - Natural Sciences

    Corequisite(s): ANT 2511L 
  
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    ANT 2511L - Biological Anthropology Laboratory


    Credit(s): 1
    This is a lab companion to an overview of biological anthropology. The students will be doing laboratories which are relevant to the class topics covered in the lecture hall in ANT 2511 .

    Corequisite(s): ANT 2511 
  
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    ANT 2721 - Anthropology of Urban Education in a Globalizing Age


    Credit(s): 3
    How can anthropology address the major issues in education in the Greater Tampa Bay area? Classwork will help students develop proposals that address pressing educational concerns facing Tampa residents.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, TGEC - Creative Thinking

  
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    ANT 3005 - The Anthropological Perspective


    Credit(s): 3
    Presents the basic concepts of anthropology as they are relevant to contemporary life. Aims at enabling the student to understand the anthropologist’s cross-cultural view of the human species as adapting through biosocial means to life on this planet.

    Restriction(s):
    • Non-Majors Only

    Other Information: May not be counted for credit toward an anthropology major.
  
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    ANT 3101 - Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    Focuses on critical thinking about the past, archaeological research. Methods, theory, web resources, and scientific analysis in the study of world prehistory, from human origins to modern times.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, HHCP - Human Historical Context & Process, CAGC - Human & Cultural Diversity in a Global Context, TGEI - Information and Data Literacy

  
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    ANT 3610 - Linguistic Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    This course studies language comparatively in cultural and social contexts and examines the role of language in the interpretation of human experience.

    Course Attribute(s): GCPC - Global Citizens Project Course

  
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    ANT 4012 - Fantastic Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    Mysteries including the Lost Continent of Atlantis, Ancient Astronauts, Piltdown Man, Psychic Archaeology, Noah’s Ark, and the Shroud of Turin will be examined, while emphasizing skills in critical thinking that have much wider practical applications.

    Restriction(s):
    • Graduate Standing
    • Senior Standing
    • Junior Standing

  
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    ANT 4014 - Anthropology of American Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines American culture from an anthropological perspective. Various sources and methods will be used in formulating our portraits including readings, films, fieldwork, and personal experiences.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4034 - Theories of Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    The major concepts that form the anthropological view of humanity are viewed in historical perspective. Basic ideas of the western philosophical tradition are analyzed from the Greeks to the 19th century when they became incorporated into the new discipline of anthropology. 20th century anthropological developments on these themes are considered.

  
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    ANT 4114 - Seminar in Archaeological Method and Theory


    Credit(s): 3
    Preliminary understanding of basic archaeological methods and theories; examines major theoretical paradigms; learn and practice different types of field methods and analyses of specific materials (i.e., ceramics, lithics, bone, etc.).

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101  with a grade of C- or better.
    Restriction(s):
    • Majors Only

  
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    ANT 4142 - Old World Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    The archaeology of Europe, Asia and Africa, from the earliest humans through the emergence of state-level societies in many parts of the Old World. The course will focus on comparative aspects of economic, social, political, and religious organization in the prehistoric Near East, Egypt, China, the Aegean, Europe and Africa.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4143 - European Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    The archaeology of Europe, from the first Paleolithic inhabitants to the fall of Roman civilization. The course will focus on ancient material culture while emphasizing social and economic questions such as the emergence of modern humans, the adoption of agriculture, the development of complex societies, and the rise of civilization.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4147 - Environmental Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines environmental constraints on ancient human societies, and how human activities have impacted the environment in the last several thousand years. Presentation of the methods used to reconstruct prehistoric environments will be followed by case studies from Florida, Central and South America, Easter Island, the Mediterranean and the Near East.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4153 - North American Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    An examination of the evidence regarding the human settlement of North America from its beginnings through the development of aboriginal culture to the period of European conquest. Emphasis on the comparative study of material culture at selected sites from all time periods. No field work is involved.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4158 - Florida Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    Culture history and culture process over 10,000 years from the time of the first people in Florida (Paleo-Indians) through the elaborate Weeden Island and Safety Harbor burial and temple mound cultures to the Spanish entrada and consequences of European conquest. Review of temporal and spatial relationships within the entire eastern U.S. and elsewhere. May be part of a summer (or other semester) field school, combined with Field Methods in Archaeology and Laboratory Methods in Archaeology.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4163 - Mesoamerican Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    The chronological sequence from its beginnings through Protohistoric development is described and analyzed. Cultures such as the Maya, Aztec, Mixtec, Zapotec, Olmec, and Toltec are included, with emphasis on the environmental setting and the relationship between cultural ecology and the growth of civilization.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4165 - South American Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    Describes and analyzes the sequence of cultural development in prehistoric South America. Cultures such as the Inca, Chavin, Mochica, Wari, Chimu are included. Emphasis on the environmental setting and the relationship between cultural ecology and the growth of civilization.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4167 - Maya, Aztec, and Inka Civilizations


    Credit(s): 3
    This course explores three major civilizations of the pre-Spanish New World from a comparative archaeological framework. Students will gain a broad understanding of the Maya, the Aztecs, and the Inka, as they compare to one another.

  
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    ANT 4172 - Historical Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    A survey and analysis of archaeology focused on the historic period. Laboratory research with data recovered from historic sites in addition to class work.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, GCPC - Global Citizens Project Course

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4176 - Archaeology of Africa


    Credit(s): 3
    Examine western myths of Africa as a Dark Continent of unsophisticated peoples; fossils revealing Africa as home of the first people; rock art/megaliths of earliest food producers; lives of the ancient pyramid builders; earliest Christian Kingdom.

  
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    ANT 4178 - The History & Archaeology of the African Diaspora


    Credit(s): 3
    Rich contributions made by African peoples to life ways outside its borders; reviewing the history of the African Diaspora; identify the earliest migrations of the African peoples into Europe and Southwest Asia.

  
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    ANT 4180 - Laboratory Methods in Archaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    Data and materials recovered from archaeological survey and excavation are processed in the laboratory; includes artifact cleaning, cataloguing, identification, and analysis; soil flotation; reconstruction and conservation of artifacts, mapmaking, etc. May be offered as part of a summer (or other semester) field session. May be combined with Florida Archaeology and Field Methods in Archaeology.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4181 - Museum Methods


    Credit(s): 3
    Design, preparation and installation of exhibits in the Department of Anthropology Teaching Exhibit Gallery. Emphasis on theory, research, design, and construction. Discussion of museum-related issues such as administration and curation.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
    Restriction(s):
    • Permit Required
    • Consent of Instructor/Department

  
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    ANT 4183C - Archaeological Science


    Credit(s): 4
    This course focuses on the application of scientific methods of analysis to archaeological materials including bone, stone, pottery, and metal. Methods include absolute dating, remote sensing, optical and SEM microscopy, elemental and isotope analysis. Laboratory sections provide hands-on experience with a variety of archaeological materials and analytical methods.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
  
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    ANT 4185 - Ancient Diets


    Credit(s): 3
    Study of archaeological remains informing us about ancient diet, including fauna and flora, microscopic soil and ceramic residues, chemical analyses of human tissues, coprolites, gut contents, tooth wear patterns, visual/artistic and written information.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
    Restriction(s):
    • Permit Required

  
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    ANT 4197 - Archaeology of Death and Burial


    Credit(s): 3
    This course examines mortuary practices cross-culturally and from an archaeological perspective to reveal both similarities and differences in the ways that societies around the world and through time deal with death and bury the dead.

  
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    ANT 4241 - Anthropology of Religion


    Credit(s): 3
    The cross-cultural study of the social and cultural aspects of religion will be explored. Religious activities in traditional and modern societies will be discussed. Ritual behavior, religious practitioners, and symbols of belief will be considered.

    Course Attribute(s): WRIN - Writing Intensive Capstone, 6ACP - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, EMWP - Major Works and Major Issues, 6ACT - State Communication Requirement

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2000 , ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4243 - The Middle East and North Africa


    Credit(s): 3
    Studying the beliefs and practices of Middle Eastern and North African societies through the perspective and engagement with humanity that is anthropology. The focus is on different Islamic societies, and the effects on them of western influence.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4260 - Ancient Trade


    Credit(s): 3
    This course focuses on long-distance trade and contact in ancient times, based on archaeological evidence and scientific studies, and how this informs us about sociopolitical systems and economic relations and how they vary over time and space.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 3101 
    Restriction(s):
    • Permit Required

  
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    ANT 4285 - Oral History


    Credit(s): 3
    A survey of history, methods and current applications of oral history research from an anthropological perspective.

    Course Attribute(s): GCPC - Global Citizens Project Course

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4302 - Gender in Cross-Cultural Perspective


    Credit(s): 3
    Examines roles of women, men, other genders and social, economic, and political aspects of sex and gender, from a biocultural, 4-field anthropological perspective, emphasizing non-Western societies and cross-cultural comparison in past and present.

    Course Attribute(s): HHCP - Human Historical Context & Process, CPST - Capstone Learning Experience, EMWP - Major Works and Major Issues

    Prerequisite(s): an anthropology or a women’s studies class
  
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    ANT 4312 - North American Indians


    Credit(s): 3
    An examination of the evidence for the origin and antiquity of human beings in North America and of patterns of regional development until the period of contact with European colonists. Emphasis on varieties of ecological adaptation, social, political and religious systems, enculturation and worldview, folklore and visual art.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4316 - Ethnic Diversity in the United States


    Credit(s): 3
    Special concerns include ethnic diversity in American society, historical and contemporary diversity in values, experiences, and lifestyles, and an examination of policies and problems affecting ethnic groups in the United States.

    Course Attribute(s): EMWP - Major Works and Major Issues

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4323 - Mexico and Central America


    Credit(s): 3
    Focuses on the history, contemporary values and interpersonal relationships, and patterns of rural and urban life in Mesoamerica. Guatemala and Mexico are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
    Restriction(s):
    • Senior Standing
    • Majors Only
    • Junior Standing

    Other Information: Anthropology majors or LACS certificate students only.
  
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    ANT 4340 - The Caribbean


    Credit(s): 3
    Main themes include: the depopulation of the aboriginal population and the resettlement of the area via slavery, indenture, and migration; contemporary ethnic heterogeneity; economic problems of Third World microstates; development of a modern social and political consciousness. Religious diversity, music, the graphic arts, and the literature of the contemporary Caribbean will also be surveyed.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
    Restriction(s):
    • Senior Standing
    • Majors Only
    • Junior Standing

  
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    ANT 4352 - Peoples of Africa


    Credit(s): 3
    Dispel myths & stereotypes of Africa; focus on African geography, history, Western misperceptions of Africa, African worldviews, philosophy, literature, health issues, debt relief, refugees, & food acquisition, security.

  
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    ANT 4390 - Visual Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    The use of photographic techniques for the cross-cultural recording and analysis of human activities. The study of ethnographic photography as both art and science, and the production of an anthropological study that expresses the goal of “visual literacy.” Review and evaluation of the uses of visual techniques and the evidence they provide to the social scientist.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
    Restriction(s):
    • Consent of Instructor/Department

  
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    ANT 4401 - Exploring Cross-Cultural Diversity


    Credit(s): 3
    This course will address a variety of challenging issues related to the general topic of cross-cultural diversity in contemporary American life.

    Course Attribute(s): TGEE - Ethical Reasoning and Civic Engagement, CPST - Capstone Learning Experience

  
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    ANT 4403 - Environmental Anthropology


    Credit(s): 3
    Explores cultural, social, political, and economic dimensions of contemporary environmental problems. Emphasis placed on the links between local-level environmental degradation and broader regional and global forces.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4432 - The Individual and Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    The relationship between the individual and society is studied cross-culturally. Main themes include child-rearing practices, psychosomatic illness and curing. Discussion of theories and models of personality development with special reference to their applicability to the emerging field of cross-cultural mental health planning.

    Course Attribute(s): 6ACT - State Communication Requirement, 6ACP - State Communication Requirement, 6ACT - Gordon Communication Requirement, EMWP - Major Works and Major Issues

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4442 - Urban Life and Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    The cross-cultural study of urbanization, urbanism and human problems associated with metropolitan environments. Emphasis on the ethnography of city life and its relationship to the practical applications of urban research.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4445 - Ancient Cities and Sustainability


    Credit(s): 3
    This course is an introduction to the process of urbanism and the rise of pre-industrial cities around the world. The course will focus on the challenges that have faced urban dwellers through the ages and how they have met/failed to meet those challenges

  
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    ANT 4462 - Health, Illness, and Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    The study of health and human behavior in cross-cultural perspective. Main themes include: the impact of disease on the development of human culture; comparative studies of curing practices; medical systems in their relationship to ideology. Emphasis on understanding the role of medicine, and the behavior of both practitioners and patients in modern societies.

    Course Attribute(s): GCPC - Global Citizens Project Course

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4465 - Anthropology of Food


    Credit(s): 3
    Examines the ways that anthropologists write and think about food, beginning with the basic anthropological perspective on food, then looking at food as a part of social rules and the life passage.

    Course Attribute(s): GCPC - Global Citizens Project Course

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4467 - Food, Health, and Culture


    Credit(s): 3
    Basic human nutritional needs & their evolutionary foundation; reconstruction of past diets; relationship between food, health & medicine; food & disease; food in religion; gender and food; food in cross-cultural perspective; political economy of food.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2000  or ANT 2410  or ANT 2511 
    Restriction(s):
    • Majors Only

  
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    ANT 4468 - Biocultural Bases of Health and Disease


    Credit(s): 3
    Study of the socio-cultural and evolutionary bases of health and disease, including such factors as evolution, genetics, environment, and socio-economics.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2511  or BSC 1005 
  
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    ANT 4472 - Work and Migration in the Americas


    Credit(s): 3
    With a focus on the intersections of class, race, gender, and citizenship, this course examines experiences of work and migration in the Americas to better understand the consequences of globalization.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
  
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    ANT 4475 - Anthropology of Childhood


    Credit(s): 3
    This course is an exploration of the emerging subfield of anthropology and childhood, engaging with literature on children, childhoods, and youth around the globe. Students read a wide variety of perspectives on anthropology and childhood.

  
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    ANT 4495 - Methods in Cultural Research


    Credit(s): 3
    The stages in the development and execution of ethnological research are discussed and practiced. Literature search, hypothesis formation, selection of data collection techniques, elicitation of information, data analysis, and report presentation are stressed. Research design models from the case literature are studied and supervised research in the local community is designed and carried out.

    Restriction(s):
    • Permit Required
    • Senior Standing
    • Junior Standing
    • Consent of Instructor/Department

  
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    ANT 4516 - Human Variation


    Credit(s): 3
    An overview of evolution and biological variations of human races. Anatomical, morphological, and physiological patterns are surveyed geographically. Cultural influences on racial biology are explored.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2511 
  
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    ANT 4520C - Forensic Anthropology


    Credit(s): 4
    This course is designed to familiarize students with forensic anthropology through lectures and lab work. Students will learn human skeletal biology for personal identification and cause of death. This course is restricted to majors and is not repeatable.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2511 
  
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    ANT 4525 - Human Osteology and Osteometry


    Credit(s): 3
    The identification of human skeletal remains, including: instrumentation and procedures; techniques for determining age at death, sex, and ancestry; and measurement of the human skeleton for comparative purposes.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2511  and ANT 2511L 
  
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    ANT 4532 - Anthropology of Infectious and Contagious Diseases


    Credit(s): 3
    This course is on communicable diseases and their transmission, cures, and change with time and technology. We will situate infectious and contagious diseases in their historical and cultural context by looking at the anthropology of these ideas.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2410 
    Corequisite(s): ANT 2511 
  
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    ANT 4536 - Bioarchaeology


    Credit(s): 3
    The study of human skeletal remains from archaeological sites, drawing on techniques from archaeology, anatomy, biology, chemistry, pathology, demography, and history to reconstruct individual lives and collective population histories across the globe.

    Prerequisite(s): ANT 2511  and ANT 2511L 
 

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